A New Race Strategy

$8bn: The amount paid by Liberty Media to acquire the commercial rights to F1
$750m: Sponsorship revenue in 2015, down from $950m in 2011
400m: F1 television audience in 2016, down from over 600m in 2008

Formula One can be a contradiction — cutting-edge on the track, a marketing anachronism off it. But 2017 is the year when the speed of change off the track may outpace the cars on it. New owner Liberty Media has bought the commercial rights to the sport for a sizable chunk of change ($8bn) and has started detailing where it sees the chance to make good on that investment.

The new management team of Chase Carey (CEO) and Sean Bratches (MD Commercial Operations) have outlined clear plans to revolutionize the way the sport is marketed and experienced. Carey has spoken about creating ’21 Super Bowls’, while Bratches has laid out four priorities, including refreshing the F1 brand, embracing digital channels, democratizing decision-making and re-imagining the race experience.There is no doubt that there are plenty of players in F1 that will find change hard when many teams and sponsors have been following the same rules for such a long time. But equally this is music to the ears of many people in F1, who have been arguing for years that the controlled and conservative commercial model it had pursued was causing F1 to fall behind in the race for consumers’ attention.

The new model is looking to build and market the F1 brand — not just the sport. One of the most exciting implications of this is F1 sponsorship becoming more attractive to consumer brands (it’s no coincidence that many current sponsors are B2B brands). I can speak from personal experience that, with a creative lens on it, F1 can open up huge consumer marketing opportunities.

When I was at Martini, our focus when we returned to the grid as title sponsor of the Williams Martini Racing team in 2014 was to disrupt the traditional sponsorship model. We sensed there was a real opportunity to shift our focus away from the track and towards the city centers where the races were being run. Similarly, our campaign didn’t rely on traditional TV-led media channels to drive exposure, but used digital and social channels to engage with our target Millennial consumers. After all, we knew that they were unlikely to be solely at the track or watching the race on TV.Rather, our activation exploited the opportunity afforded by the extraordinary race locations from Milan to Sao Paulo as playgrounds for non-traditional F1 marketing. We treated the race like a city-wide festival, targeting not only the race weekend, but also the week-long build-up, when the energy of the city noticeably rises with the anticipation of the race coming to town. We fed that excitement by creating Martini Terrazzas in Millennial-dense city center locations, fusing music, food, art and, of course, F1 to create the ultimate physical manifestation of the Martini lifestyle. We then drove the unique content it generated around the city, country and world through on-site, live social war rooms. It was disruptive and effective. We were not only able to create buzz and energy around the brand, but drive sales among a new and younger audience.

It wasn’t always easy and it wasn’t always perfect, but we learnt a hell of a lot on the way. Most importantly, it proved the power of F1 to reach a younger, more connected audience away from the track and traditional channels. With sound data and powerful insights giving us a good understanding of our audience’s behavior, we were able to use F1 to create something that differentiated us from our competition and brought new fans to our brand and the sport.

The idea of bringing fans closer to F1 was also a core element of our recent activation with Bose and the Mercedes AMG PETRONAS Formula One team. Our ambition was simple — to use the power of sound to transport people into one of the most exclusive places in all of sport: the triple world champions’ team garage in the moments immediately before the cars go out onto the grid.The Garage was a truly ground-breaking multi-sensory, immersive experiential activation that we created in Austin, Texas to demonstrate the industry-leading Bose QuietComfort 35 Wireless Noise Cancelling Headphones. We used the true sounds of the team garage to create a 360° soundscape, and a custom-developed play-back engine used the Bose headphones to deliver exactly the right sound to each ear as the fan moved around the space. We took nearly 4,000 fans (plus Lewis Hamilton and Nico Rosberg) inside the inner sanctum of F1, while the digital content was shared by millions.In my view, Casey’s ‘21 Super Bowls’ is spot on, and Liberty Media’s stake in Live Nation further enhances their credentials in the space. They have created the opportunity, but now it’s down to the teams, sponsors and agencies to make the most of it.

Another item that will no doubt be right on top of the new American owners’ agenda will be breaking the USA — the toughest (and most domestically saturated) sports market on the planet — but also the one with the greatest growth opportunity. As Bratches has said: ‘Having the theater of Formula 1 in the backdrop of the iconic US cities could be very attractive’, and it’s not hard to see why. For F1 to call itself truly global, and to reverse a downward sponsorship income from $950m in 2011 to $750m in 2015, it must become more than a niche sport in the world’s biggest media market, with the vast eyeballs, engagement and sponsorship dollars that entails.

Even though it is still largely viewed as an unknown curiosity, it is associated with a mixture of cutting-edge technology and old world European glamor, which is not a bad place to start. NBC, the domestic F1 broadcaster, has showed some growth in F1 ratings over the last few years, albeit off a low base.
And the good news is that Bratches, a 27-year veteran of ESPN, knows better than most how to build a sports fan base in the US. He knows the power of storytelling to capture the imagination of the audience. Focusing on the personalities of the drivers, the intense rivalries and the rich history of the sport (including two American world champions in Mario Andretti and Phil Hill), F1 provides an extraordinarily rich vein of content for an audience that can’t get enough of sports history and stories.

Of course, for a country that loves a winner, it will also be critical for the US-owned Haas team to see some success, while getting home-grown and competitive drivers behind a steering wheel as fast as possible is also imperative. It would also not be a surprise to see the introduction of some technical and format changes that would spice up the racing and make it more appealing to a US audience.

All of this might mean that sponsors — many of whom are based in the States — might need to invest a little bit ahead of the curve, but with so much to play for, surely it’s a risk worth taking. Week-long festivals, which combine world-class sport with technology, music, fashion and celebrity, based around street circuits in New York, Miami or LA and heavily marketed to a Millennial audience through re-vamped social channels and distribution platforms. Now that’s a future for F1 that’s easy to buy into.

When the cars take to the grid in Melbourne, it will officially signal the start of a new era of leadership for F1. Liberty Media has talked an impressive game in terms of up-front investment, focus and desire to expand the sport. Now the race is on for teams and their sponsors to rise to the challenge.

Engagement Design – Less is Always More

'Engagement Design' isn’t just about how your campaign looks, it’s about how your campaign works. In this digital age we have ever-decreasing attention spans. It has never been more important to use design to grab and hold attention. If design is complicated the consumer could become confused – or worse, bored – and instantly lose interest in your message. And, you don’t have long to secure that interest: research by the Centre for Cognitive Psychology and Methodology into ‘The role of visual complexity’ shows that visual complexity can turn consumers off within as little as 17 milliseconds.Subconsciously, consumers have become super-fast content filterers. They judge a book – or blog post, podcast or film – very much by its cover. They are more engaged with simple design that focuses on the necessities of the message and are less attracted to the ‘bells and whistles’ of more elaborate work.Google, the most popular search engine on the planet, shows exactly how it is done, with a homepage designed entirely around the essentials, its search function.

But Google’s approach execution of simplicity is just one of many, so with that in mind it’s worth considering the different ways in which a clear message can be delivered, based on different desired outtakes.

The 5 ‘whys’ of ‘Engagement Design’

• Design to Inform – Presenting data or information in an engaging way
• Design to Intrigue – Creating the desire to engage with content
• Design to Invite – Encouraging consumers to engage with brand activations
• Design to Impact – Capturing attention and making memorable moments
• Design to Introduce – Drumming up excitement for releases or upcoming events

DESIGN TO INFORM:
Accenture #SeeBeyond – RBS 6 Nations 2017

Our match sheets for Accenture are designed to feed rugby fans with interesting insights in the build-up to RBS 6 Nations games. This simple data design has been a huge success. By the third round of this year’s competition we have seen a 140% increase on clicks through to Accenture’s Rugby hub compared to 2016, when design was both darker and more complex.

DESIGN TO INTRIGUE:
Synergy - NowNewNext 2017

The design of Synergy’s NowNewNext 2017 is a great example of how simple design can create not only interest, but the desire to learn more. Abstract imagery and engaging article titles were designed to demand the further scrutiny of our intelligent and ambitious audience.

DESIGN TO INVITE:
IG – HARLEQUINS

Our Live Every Dream competition for IG invited fans to enter to win the tour of a lifetime…the chance to enjoy a once-in-a-lifetime rugby experience usually reserved for the pros. Dream-like montages sat within silhouettes of professional player portraits, clearly capturing the calibre of the prize.

DESIGN TO IMPACT
SynergyLive – Rugby World Cup 2015

SynergyLive is our real-time social media marketing offering. Never is it more about capturing attention than in the heat of the moment, when demand for eyeballs and engagement is at a premium. Simple design that pops in a fan’s social feed is vital. Our work for Canterbury around the Rugby World Cup 2015 featured many examples of super-simple real-time moment marketing.

DESIGN TO INTRODUCE
Royal Salute – Stories of Power & Grace

None of us are strangers to the power of a great movie trailer. It’s all about teasing just enough, without giving the game away, especially when the final edit is often no more than 3 minutes long! With multiple video formats vying for our attention across a plethora of social feeds, there’s an art in designing the perfect thumbnail image that will elicit the relevant click-through, turning a potential viewer into an actual viewer.

Although these designs are very different and not all plain white pages with a pithy statement written in ‘Helvetica Neue’, they are all still very simple and convey a single message in a very clear fashion. It’s very easy to forget the main message you want to convey, and try to get as much ‘brand value’ from an image by cluttering it up with links to websites, Instagram, Twitter and Facebook.This is why we often look at a design once we are happy with a concept and then ask: “Right, what DON’T we need? What isn’t a necessity to our message?” That way we can make sure that our message isn’t being diluted by unnecessary clutter.

In this chaotic and fast-paced world we all now live in, it’s nice to take a step back and just remind ourselves that ‘less is always more’.

21st Century Girls

During Engine’s 21st Century Woman event yesterday, surrounded by a collection of clients and colleagues, listening to a captivating panel of women including Stella Creasy MP and Kate Dale of #ThisGirlCan fame, I found myself reminiscing about bedtime stories with my 4-year-old daughter from the previous evening. No, it wasn’t being on the 6th floor of Foyles bookshop on Charing Cross Road that got me thinking. I was still very much tuned into the discussion on how women are depicted in marketing and popular culture. But my conscience had been pricked by the realisation that I was part of the problem under the spotlight – in the same way that panellist Harriet Hall (Features Editor of Stylist.co.uk) had caught herself asking ‘What’s her name?’ when a friend said she had found a new cleaner. Do the seemingly innocuous bedtime stories I have been reading to my daughters propagate the very same outdated gender stereotypes that were being laid waste by the panel?

So last night, on the eve of International Women’s Day, I decided to check the bookshelves at home. And there it was: gender stereotyping writ large in oversized text and pretty illustrations of domesticated women and hard-working men. Mums doing household chores. Dads fixing things. A preponderance of male central characters. Even the anthropomorphised animal characters were overwhelmingly male and heroic. It was more proof, as if any were needed, of the antiquated way gender roles are depicted in popular culture.Engine’s 21st Century Woman study had a very particular take on who shares blame and who has the responsibility to improve the situation: the marketing community. The research, compiled over 12 months, with input from 1,000 UK women, had some pretty damning evidence of how brands are failing to accurately portray women through marketing. 76% of women think that brands are not representing them properly, and 40% of women cite advertising and the way brands talk to them as one of the most likely reasons to be self-critical.The research also showed that 86% of women enjoy being a woman (yes, that means 14% don’t) but 45% find it difficult, primarily as a result of institutionalised sexism. Marketing at large is not just failing to address the issue of ‘damaging and dangerous gender stereotyping’ (Harriet Hall), but helping embed it in society. According to Stella Creasy, ‘advertisers are the front line of a cultural war’, and most of them seem to be on the wrong side.

Day job aside, as a father of two 21st Century girls, this is all pretty troubling. Until yesterday, I thought my parental efforts against gender stereotyping had been relatively robust. My wife and I chose a neutral colour for the nursery. My daughters are subjected to a fair amount of ‘male’ sports such as cricket and rugby on TV. The All Blacks are their favourite team (it’s more about the "pre-match dancing" than backing the winning team), and if New Zealand are not playing, the 4-year-old will support whoever is wearing blue. I’ve instituted regular ‘cooking lessons with daddy’, which, I tell myself is to make sure they don’t develop gender associations with domestic roles (although if my wife reads this she’ll probably question why that doesn’t apply to the laundry). And I made sure the girls' first trip to a major sporting event was to see professional über-talented women play, at The SSE Women’s FA Cup Final at Wembley. I’m not expecting the 1-year-old to have identified any female role models, but it is a memory that will be established in the re-telling.

Granted, the nursery paint colour might ever so slightly be influenced by not knowing what sex our firstborn would be, and there is heavy personal agenda in all the above. I love watching sport. After all, it is part of my job (no, my wife doesn’t buy that line either). In a parallel life I would quite like to have been a chef. But if those personal biases give my daughters a less gendered upbringing and avoid fostering unconscious biases in their little brains, I’m comfortable with the egoism at play.

I’m hoping it will all add up to sense that they can do anything with their lives, without pre-conceived, gender-defined paths. At the moment the 4-year-old self-identifies as a Ninja Turtle and wants to be Leonardo (blue bandana) when she grows up, although I’m wondering if it’s a phase (and now wondering why there aren’t any female ninja turtles...I’m sure the Renaissance had some pretty awesome female role models). She likes tennis, ballet (mixed class), dinosaurs, baking, rugby tackling and anything blue (did I mention that already?), so I'm hoping we've avoided too many gender stereotyping clangers.

The panel discussion highlighted so many areas where I can do more in my day-to-day interactions at home. Bedtime stories is one of them. But if I learnt one thing yesterday above all else, it is that my efforts to avoid gender stereotyping in my daughters' upbringing doesn’t stop when I leave the house for work. It is about making sure any clients or brands I work with reject stereotyping through their marketing and advertising, so the depictions my daughters see challenge the status quo. There was so much sense spoken yesterday, but maybe the panel was wrong about one thing – social media isn’t the front line of female oppression. It’s bedtime stories.

Two Steps Forward, One Step Back

On March 7th, as I sat in the audience of Engine's 21st Century Woman event, I couldn’t help but feel the momentum behind the profile and awareness of women’s sport. We are moving in the right direction. The world is slowly waking up to an equal playing field and diverse boardrooms equating to a stronger economy and future. We already know the social and physical benefits of sport, and new research from Women in Sport and Investec goes further to highlight the benefits this gives women in their personal and professional endeavors. In its entirety, the progress of Women’s Sport is positive. Yet there is still this underlying attitude that likes to rear its ugly head: we seem to take two steps forward, and one step back.

October 2015 | Chelsea Ladies Leading the Way.
For the second season running the Women’s Super League went down to the final game, with Chelsea Ladies clinching their first ever title. The win also landed Chelsea their second trophy of the season after their victory over Notts County in The 2015 SSE Women’s FA Cup Final. This success would have been unlikely had the women’s team’s future been left in the hands of the club’s board. It was the then Chelsea F.C. and England captain, John Terry, who came to the rescue when their budgets were cut in 2009.

November 2015| Slow Progess for NGOs
Change needs to start at the top. Having a greater number of women in decision-making roles will benefit sport at every level. The annual ‘Trophy Women’ Report, published by Women in Sport, highlighted that almost half of sporting organisations boards failed to meet the 25% gender balance guideline, while 16% were found to have no women at executive level at all.

December 2015 | Women’s Participation Rising Faster than Men’s
Good news: the gender gap is closing at a grassroots level. Sport England released its latest findings from its Active People Survey. The number of people regularly playing sport rose by 1.65 million between 2005 and 2015, with the rise driven by an increase in the number of women playing sport. 7.01 million females aged 16 years or over (31.2%) played sport once a week, with running the fastest growing sport for women.

January 2016 | Gayle’s Conduct Falls Short
Gender equality is not recognised by all. West Indies cricketer Chris Gayle rightly drew sharp criticism for his comments after asking out reporter Mel McLaughlin live on air. He was subsequently fined £4,900 for his remarks.

February 2016 | NFL Believes in Diversity
Across the pond, the NFL continued with its efforts to encourage female involvement in the sport. February 2016 saw the introduction of a “Rooney Rule” for women, requiring teams to interview female candidates for “executive positions”.

March 2016 | Indian Wells CEO Sparks Outrage
Another day, another example of a high-profile gender howler. Indian Wells CEO, Raymond Moore’s comments that the women’s tour “rides on the coat-tails” of the men’s game received widespread backlash, resulting in his resignation. This reignited the debate of women’s pay in tennis – despite the sport remunerating men and women equally across the four Grand Slams.

April 2016 | Netball Goes Full Time
England Netball announced that players would go full-time from June 2016, with 14 players initially selected to join the summer training camp. The move is part of England Netball’s mission to reach the 2019 World Cup.

May 2016 | Record SSE Women’s FA Cup Crowd
For the second season running, The SSE Women’s FA Cup Final was held in front of a record crowd. Nearly 33,000 people were in Wembley Stadium, with millions more at watching from home as Arsenal defeated current holders Chelsea to claim their 14th title.

June 2016 | Synergy: This Girl Does
Synergy’s event with Jacqui Oatley MBE, Tanya Joseph, Colin Banks, Ruth Holdaway and Carly Telford provided thought-provoking discussion. Brands left with a clear positive message on the commercial and social value to be gained from women’s sport partnerships. See here for our seven top takeaways from the day.

July 2016 | Royal Troon Enters a New Age
After Muirfield voted not to admit women members in May, Royal Troon showed the golfing world the way forward as their members “overwhelmingly” voted to allow women to join.

August 2016 | RFU Tackles Sexism
The RFU announced they are to award 48 new contracts, including 16 full-time deals, to members of the senior women’s squad ahead of their World Cup defense in 2017. The decision came as part of new £1 million investment in the women’s game, and will allow the squad to train full-time.

August 2016 | Olympic Coverage Backlash
Media coverage of female achievements during the Rio Games was consistently slammed as sexist and degrading. From Andy Murray’s put down of John Inverdale to Helen Skelton’s wardrobe debate, everyday sexism within the media was quickly shut down. The level of backlash to the media coverage showed a growing intolerance of gender inequality amongst sports fans and represents a new age of women’s sport reporting.

September 2016 | ‘Vast’ gender wage gap still exists
As we begin to feel we’d climbed the summit, our summer and post-Olympic come down was worsened by the Gender Balance in Global Sport report. Published by Women on Boards, it found significant differences in pay for men and women in basketball, golf and football.

September 2016 | City Make the Front Page
Ending on a high, Manchester City claimed their first WSL title in style, beating the current champions 2-0 and earning a rare front-page slot in The Guardian. A watershed moment for the women’s game, and a huge step forward for Women’s Sport.

Recapping on the year, it is apparent the media, sponsors, governing bodies and NGOs are all saying, doing, or acknowledging what needs to be done to continue to move forward. Disappointingly, the work of the many is all quickly undermined by the headline-grabbing actions of the few. Fortunately, opposing these outdated perceptions is a much stronger force and fans are ready to openly voice their outrage and disagreement. 10 years ago complaints would be buried in the news editors’ inboxes; today sport is an ongoing social media spectacle, and fans are the harshest, but most honest critics. Harnessing the power of them will be integral to really making a difference. Surely this, combined with new research, is enough for us to take action, instead of continuing to simply highlight the issues? I remind myself that we’re preaching to the converted: a room full of women – and men – who are at the forefront of advocating and supporting change.

We retweet, like and love posts from people that share and validate our opinion. But we are people who love sport, work in sport, and are already invested in it promoting women’s sport.

So, how do we only move forward? Women’s Sport needs to evolve from a movement into the norm. Women's Sport needs bigger brands that talk to a bigger audience. Brands have the power to reach the masses and be a part of social change.

After all, actions speak louder than words.